Kinetic Energy To Thermal Energy - How hard a chicken needs to be slapped to get it cooked ??

Kinetic Energy To Thermal Energy - How hard a chicken needs to be slapped to get it cooked ??

                                             Science altogether is a crazy subject as it will make you stun for N number of things associated with it. People are crazier than science as they will try to adjust the logics and create more nutsy applications with science. One such application is 

“If kinetic energy can be converted into thermal energy, then can we cook a chicken using kinetic energy??”



If we keep the viability of idea for commercialization aside for some time, just scribbling through some calculations related to thermal and kinetic energy conversions we can actually arrive at a value of required kinetic energy to cook a chicken

To cook chicken, it must be raised to 75°C approximately. Assuming the room is at 20°C for simplicity, We need to raise the temperature of the chicken by 55°C. Generally normal chicken meat will have about 75% water which has a very high specific heat. That means it takes a lot of energy to raise the temperature of water compared to other materials. The specific heat of water is 1 calorie/gram-degree Celsius or 4.184 Joules/gram-degree Celsius. Because chicken meat is mostly water, if we use the specific heat of water to calculate how much energy we have to add to the chicken to cook it, we will be erring on the safe side, since the other things in chicken meat likely require less thermal energy.
Next we need to consider how much chicken meat we are trying to cook. I speak of meat, because in practical terms, the chicken will have to be prepared for cooking anyway, by removing feathers, feet and beak (although some people love those, but they likely cook differently than the rest of the chicken). Personally I would remove the giblets, but to each his own. If you are trying to cook your chicken “on the foot”, i.e. dead but otherwise intact, you may have to modify these calculations. The average rotisserie chicken is 2–3 lb, so let's say between 1 and 1.5 kg of meat to cook. I’ll do the calculations for 1 kg, and you can adjust as needed.
That’s 1 kg X 4.184 kJoules/kg-°C * 55°C= 230 kJoules. Now, it’s difficult to say how hard you would have to hit it to increase the internal energy by that amount, unless we make some other assumptions. Let us assume that you slap the chicken meat and your force is applied over a displacement of 1 cm. This would be reasonable if the chicken meat were on a rigid table, and you slapped straight down. Then, the work that your force would do, i.e. the energy it would transfer to the chicken, per 1 Newton of force would be 0.01 J. That means if you slapped with a force of one Newton, you would need to slap it a minimum of 23 million times to transfer 230 kJoules of energy. If we assume a more reasonable 10 N per slap, this would only require 2.3 million slaps. This assumes that all the energy goes into internal energy of the chicken, i.e. none is lost in vibrating or denting the table, in the well-known sound that slapping a hunk of chicken meat would make, or in bruising your hand. Perhaps we should double the force or number of hits required, to account for energy that doesn’t transfer to the meat. Also, this needs to be done in some kind of way that would insulate the chicken so that no heat is lost as you slap-cook it. That seems to be the biggest problem, because of the length of time 2.3 million slaps would take.
I wouldn’t recommend this method of cooking a chicken for a hungry family rather order online or cook on conventional stove itself!!!!  

No logics plss....This is just an illustration

4 comments:

  1. You wouldn't need all 55C. By slapping the chicken with your 37C hand or 40C when wearing a warm blanket in summer weather with high fever, you should quickly transfer your body to the chicken in a few thousand slaps, so only 35C is needed. If we do the calculations again, we see that you only need 1.5 million slaps to cook a chicken, saving you 800,000 slaps.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Are you wondering where to order the best ((Direct Chicken Export To Hong Kong)) ? Gaia Alimentos S/A supplies you with the best quality ((Direct Chicken Export To Hong Kong)).As an exporter of frozen chicken paws, frozen chicken feet, whole frozen chicken etc, Gaia Alimentos S/A takes care of the exportation and importation all over the world in the major production units

    ReplyDelete
  3. You can find these feeds at any feed store. Supplementing this diet isn't necessary but chickens do enjoy it. distributor ayam karkas

    ReplyDelete
  4. I like this article. I was searching over search engines and found your blog and its really helps thank you so much. Nice post. Thanks for sharing amazing tips. we also provide Grade A Halal Brazilian Chicken Paws for sale. for more information visit on our website.

    ReplyDelete